6 Ways to Hide Your Roots

Posted by Audrey Kunin, MD There have been 0 comments

Hide Your RootsIn my late twenties, I made a pact with a friend that we’d tell each other immediately if we ever spotted visible grays in our hair. At the time, a telltale white streak seemed like the worst possible breach of youthfulness. Many years—and many more errant grays and dye jobs later—it still bothers me if I suspect someone notices white patches at my roots, hairline or temples. If the situation bothers you too, here are six simple between-color-appointment fixes—whether you’re covering grays or masking a dark root stripe.

1. Shampoo smarter.

Most salon experts don’t recommend shampooing every day, since oily hair flattens your hair and enhances root color irregularities. Dry shampoos absorb excess scalp grease and give your tresses more camouflaging texture.

2. Downplay your part.

If you always split your hair in the same place, that area naturally flattens and becomes more prominent. Flip your part to the other side of your head, and regrowth will be less noticeable, since a perfectly straight part is a dead giveaway for roots.

3. Pump it up.

A salon blowout that creates body and volume at the roots helps camouflage unsightly grays, and it can help you go a few weeks longer between color or highlight appointments. To volumize at home, backcomb your roots, set them in rollers, or use a curling iron.

4. Pencil it in.

I used to comb mascara on my temples, but now there are now touch-up wands and pens on the market that are designed specifically for that purpose. And in a pinch, blondes can use baby powder and brunettes a brown eyeshadow shade.

5. Spray it on.

Once the territory of Halloween costumes, spray-on color products can subtly stretch time between color appointments. It may take a few spritzes to get the hang of applying it, but once my aim improved, it covered grays well.

6. Color your roots yourself.

While the other strategies simply mask regrowth, root-coloring kits contain ingredients that permanently alter the color of your hair. Choose a shade one lighter and more neutral than what you are trying to achieve to allow the natural warmth of your hair to come through.

By Cathy Garrard
DERMAdoctor Staff Writer

This content is sponsored by DERMAdoctor. The author receives compensation for its creation. All content is the legal copyright of DERMAdoctor, Inc, and it may not be used, reprinted, or published without written consent.

The information provided is for entertainment purposes only and is not intended to provide medical, legal or other professional advice.


This post was posted in Beauty, Blog Posts, Hair and was tagged with hair, makeup

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