Health Problems Your Mirror May Be Reflecting

Posted by Audrey Kunin, MD There have been 0 comments

Health ProblemsWe've all had bad hair days, but what's going on when your face isn't reflecting the look you want? If you spy: dark circles, flushed skin, stray hairs, or other changes, rule out these underlying health problems.

RED SKIN

THE COMMON EXPLANATION:
Some people naturally flush and blush with shyness, alcohol consumption, coffee drinking, or stress. And, of course, a red tone is also a result of unprotected sun exposure.

THE MEDICAL PROBLEM:
If the redness persists, you may have rosacea, a chronic skin condition that may also lead to swelling and acne-like skin sores. The condition is considered harmless—although it can make sufferers feel self-conscious—and it typically isn’t caused by a serious underlying medical condition. Fair-skinned women aged 30 to 50 are at the greatest risk, so if you fall in that demo, talk to your doctor about possible diagnosis and treatment. Rosacea is typically treated with antibiotics, but there is no cure.

DARK CIRCLES

THE COMMON EXPLANATION:
Raccoon eyes are often a by-product of thinning under-eye skin, which is largely a result of the collagen loss that naturally happens as we grow older. Dark circles are a problem for people of all races, but they can be more pronounced in people with olive or dark skin.

THE MEDICAL PROBLEM:
Dark circles may be a sign that you're suffering from allergies or nasal congestion. Those conditions make your blood vessels more prominent, and that makes your circles more obvious too. Treating the condition with antihistamines may help reduce their dark appearance.

DARK SPOTS AND MOLES

THE COMMON EXPLANATION:
Some people naturally have beauty marks—Cindy Crawford and Marilyn Monroe made careers out of theirs, after all. Sun spots, on the other hand, are small brown usually harmless patches that are typically caused by a lifetime of overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

THE MEDICAL PROBLEM:
The moles and dark patches to watch out for are the ones that creep up suddenly, or the existing ones that morph into asymmetrical shapes with irregular borders and coloration. And size matters too: If it's wider than the tip of your pinky, you should consult a dermatologist immediately.

By Cathy Garrard
DERMAdoctor Staff Writer

This content is sponsored by DERMAdoctor. The author receives compensation for its creation. All content is the legal copyright of DERMAdoctor, Inc, and it may not be used, reprinted, or published without written consent.

The information provided is for entertainment purposes only and is not intended to provide medical, legal or other professional advice.


This post was posted in Beauty, Blog Posts, Eyes, Rosacea and was tagged with skin conditions, dark circles, rosacea

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